Hundreds Gather to Remember D-Day - WSET.com - ABC13

Hundreds Gather to Remember D-Day

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D-Day Veterans D-Day Veterans

Reporter: Lauren Compton l Videographer: Jemon Haskins

Bedford, VA- Allied Forces stormed the beaches of Normandy 68 years ago marking the beginning of the end of World War II. Hundreds gathered at the National D-Day Memorial in Bedford Wednesday to remember those who fought on that day.

This year's anniversary was very different from past years. Every June 6, the National D-Day Memorial remembers those fallen on D-Day and those still standing.

"It's good to be together with my brothers again," said Mills Hobb, a D-Day veteran.

"You think back to so many things, so many things go through your head. It's just good to be here," said Glenwood Hankins, a D-Day Veteran.

But for many veterans there was also a deep sadness for the man who could not be here: 87-year-old WWII veteran Bob Slaughter.

"He was a good man, and a great man. He had the vision and the fortitude to help get this place started," said Hobbs.

Slaughter is credited with founding the D-Day Memorial.

"It's going to be a different memorial. I think we are determined to get the job done and fulfill his dream," said Robin Reed, president of the National D-Day Memorial.

While saying goodbye to one veteran, the D-Day Memorial welcomed another. Amin Isbir's named was added to the memorial wall set up to honor the hundreds of veterans who died serving on June 6.

Until recently, Isbir's death certificate read June 8, 1944.

"Me personally I felt like his soul was never at rest. You're buried and you have a headstone just above your body and it says something wrong," said Eric Montgomery, Isbir's nephew.

It took eight years, but Eric Montgomery confirmed his great uncle actually died on D-Day. This recognition is now a piece of closure for Isbir's family.

"To me it's a validation on what happened on that day of days," said Montgomery.

Isbir's headstone in Normandy was also changed with the correct date. The National D-Day Memorial is the only institution in the world that researches the name of every soldier, sailor, airman and coast guardsmen killed on D-Day.

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