Voters Work to See Through Political Spin - WSET.com - ABC13

Voters Work to See Through Political Spin

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Roanoke, VA - The Democratic Party of Virginia is continuing a two week tour leading up to the Democratic National Convention with a stop Thursday in Roanoke.

The main message is correcting what they say is wrong information being pushed by the GOP regarding Medicare.

But they say the tough part belongs to the independent voters that are working to figure out which side is telling the truth.

For several weeks now, Vice Presidential candidate Paul Ryan has been saying the President will cut more than $700 billion from Medicare to support the Affordable Care Act, trying to sway voters toward the GOP.

"The biggest threat to Medicare is "ObamaCare" and we're going to stop it," said Ryan at the Republican National Convention Wednesday night.

It's a figure that has been contested from the beginning and is now the focus of a Democratic counter attack.

"Those savings are not from beneficiaries - the actual Virginia seniors. That's not where that money's being saved. Their quality healthcare is not being changed at all," said Brian Moran with the Democratic Party of Virginia.

The same goes for the 2012 election. To counter these disparities, both sides employ a strategy that stages photo-ops to try to convince journalists to cover their position.

It's that type of quick soundbite work that appeals to Ava Mcleod when she's trying to understand things.

"It's confusing…read about it every once in a while. Mostly the comments on television," said Ava Mcleod, who's leaning Republican.

That's not the case for Philip Dooley, who is thinking of voting Democrat. He knows these issues are complicated and uses a variety of ways to vet the information he is considering.

"If someone says that's true in 30 seconds, you have to find out if that is a fact," he said.

In the end, it all comes down to the voter and how much time they put into actually researching and truly understanding the particular spin they're hearing.

One way you can try to get a handle on the spin that is dealt to you is to check out the nonaffiliated website FactCheck.org. The group claims to be a nonpartisan consumer advocate that is dedicated to doing exactly what the name implies.

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