UPDATE: Snow Finally Ends After Burying Areas Under Two Feet of - WSET.com - ABC13

UPDATE: Snow Finally Ends After Burying Areas Under Two Feet of Snow

Posted:
This map will be updated. It shows snow totals BEFORE the second batch of snow arrived were already well over a foot before noon Thursday. The final map will show much higher totals. This map will be updated. It shows snow totals BEFORE the second batch of snow arrived were already well over a foot before noon Thursday. The final map will show much higher totals.
Current snow totals are at 24" in Floyd County and Roanoke County isn't far behind at 20". Current snow totals are at 24" in Floyd County and Roanoke County isn't far behind at 20".
Many locations from Giles County to Blacksburg have nearly 2 feet of snow on the ground. Many locations from Giles County to Blacksburg have nearly 2 feet of snow on the ground.
Radford and Bent Mountain also have amounts near 20-24". Lower amounts east, but still over a foot in Bedford. Radford and Bent Mountain also have amounts near 20-24". Lower amounts east, but still over a foot in Bedford.

Lynchburg, VA - The final phase of a history snowstorm dumped another 1 to 4" of snow on areas that already picked up well over a foot of snow Wednesday night.

Wednesday's system and snow was more related to the surface low and the flow around it. Temperatures were very cold in the teens, however, so despite the warmer air pushing north, a dry snow quickly accumulated by early afternoon Wednesday.

As the storm wound up, it took a track from the Gulf of Mexico to up the East Coast, allowing for lots of moisture to be pulled into the cold air draining in from the north; a classic track for heavy snow storms in Virginia.

By midnight, just enough warm air a few thousand feet up changed some of the snow to sleet and freezing rain. However, the storm was so strong that winds were blowing the dry snow and sleet around, creating drifts of one to two feet in spots and playing havoc on crews trying to keep roads clear.

During the early morning hours of Thursday, the moisture with the surface system moved to our north, giving most areas a break.

The storm wasn't finished, however.

High up in the sky, the jet stream's energy - the "core" of the system (an upper low) - started to move in from the west.

The upper low, spinning counter-clockwise created lift underneath it, generating it's own moisture.

By noon, very heavy snow bands sent amounts higher by another 1 to 6 inches, depending on your location. The system was so impressive, the Storm Prediction Center, which normally covers tornadoes in the spring, issued two special discussions for the Greater Lynchburg area mentioning the likelihood of 1-2" per hour snowfall rates.

More accidents were reported across the entire area as the snow piled up fast on top of what had already fallen Wednesday night.

The last of the snow moved east with the upper low Thursday after sunset.

Despite drier weather, snow will likely stay on the ground for several days.

For more on the forecast, head to the ABC 13 Weather Center.

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