New Prescription Opiate Zohydro Has Strong Potential for Abuse Warns Aid in Recovery - WSET.com - ABC13

New Prescription Opiate Zohydro Has Strong Potential for Abuse Warns Aid in Recovery

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Controversial Hydrocodone-Based Painkiller Zohydro contains strong potential for addiction and as a substitute for OxyContin and heroin abuse. Aid in Recovery calls for the removal of the drug from the market.

(PRWEB) August 28, 2014

Aid in Recovery, a full service drug and alcohol treatment center, released a statement today regarding the potential for abuse of a dangerous new painkiller, Zohydro, which is marketed to chronic pain sufferers. The drug, an extended-release painkiller that contains hydrocodone, is available in doses up to 50 milligrams, which is much higher than many similar hydrocodone prescription pills.

According to the manufacturer, Zogenix, the drug was created to avoid liver damage, which is a risk with drugs that contain both hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Zohydro contains no acetaminophen, and so negates that risk.

The drug is meant to release small dosages of hydrocodone to the body over time. However, Zohydro contains no abuse-deterring properties, so addicts can easily crush up the drug and snort it to receive the entire dosage of hydrocodone immediately. The potential for abuse is alarming, and since there are so many other choices for pain medication, many of which already contain abuse-deterrents, Zohydro is a particularly dangerous and unnecessary medication. Even Zogenixs page on Zohydro warns of addiction and abuse risks, even at recommended doses.

Aid in Recovery calls for heavy FDA scrutiny of Zohydro, and believes that the best solution is likely the removal of the drug from the market. Instead, medication manufacturers should focus on the creation of pain creams and other non-addictive pain solutions with limited potential for abuse.

Zohydro is just another drug that can further prescription and opiate abuse in this country, which in recent years is such a rapidly growing epidemic, said Michael Lukens, Psychologist at Aid in Recovery. We need more common sense products that dont worsen this trend, not more drugs that feed addiction and introduce new users to opiates.

Aid in Recovery will continue to monitor the news surrounding Zohydro, and hopes to see a resolution that keeps new drugs out of the hands of prescription drug and opiate abusers. For more information on treatment and addiction programs available at Aid in Recovery, visit them at http://www.aidinrecovery.com/

About Us

Aid in Recovery is a premier drug and alcohol treatment center. Our approach is defined by recognizing each clients need for a personalized drug and alcohol treatment program. We aren't a hospital-like institution and theres a good reason for that. We believe that treating each client as an individual is crucial to delivering the best possible patient care. At a busy clinic-like program, it simply isn't possible for a therapist to truly get to know each client and understand their specific needs. To best meet the needs of each patient we treat, we offer a diverse curriculum with a focus on both mind and body designed to meet the individual. We treat every patient as an individual and we work with one patient at a time and guide them to a new life in recovery. To learn more about the specifics of our program, please visit our program details page.

View our drug and alcohol treatment services or give us a call at 1-855-223-6171.

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